Mobile

The Rise of Mobile Cards

Posted in 2010s, Articles, Basics, Interface Design, Mobile on September 8th, 2014 by Dan – Be the first to comment

Cezary Pietrzak, “The Rise of Mobile Cards,” 2014

Born from the frustrations of using a smartphone, cards have quickly become the go-to design metaphor of mobile. They’re simple to understand and visually appealing, and they perfectly accommodate the interactive nature of the medium.

What is a Card?

Posted in 2010s, Articles, Interface Design, Mobile on September 8th, 2014 by Dan – Be the first to comment

Khoi Vihn, “What is a Card?” 2014

We used to sit down with software and point and click on things; now we carry software around and tap, swipe, pinch and zoom on things. As our computing habits have gotten more mobile and more physical, the metaphor of pages, which implies a more focused, dedicated frame of mind, has become less useful.

Cards offer an alternative metaphor that’s much more complementary to how we use phones and tablets.

How Print is the Future of Interaction

Posted in 2010s, Articles, Inspirational, Interface Design, Mobile on March 18th, 2012 by Dan – Be the first to comment

Mike Kruzeniski, How Print Design is the Future of Interaction, 2011

The literal analog affordance is no longer necessary, and yet, it’s the default path that so many interactive experiences follow. We don’t need to make an eBook look like a book for people to understand how to use it. The book isn’t the cover and binding, it’s the images and the text that make the story. Similarly, a movie doesn’t need to look like a DVD on a shelf to understand that it belongs to a collection, and an audio mixer doesn’t require cables and knobs to be capable as a tool, and a Notebook does not require leather and a spiral bind to be familiar. In the early days of interaction design when software concepts were best explained through heavy handed metaphors, the familiarity of these objects and textures was appropriate. However, the rendering of artifacts has outlived its usefulness as the definitive approach to UI design. As Designers we should be critiquing it for what it often is: shallow, meaningless, and often distracting from the information it surrounds.

Portable Cathedrals

Posted in 2010s, Articles, Hardware, Mobile on March 18th, 2012 by Dan – Be the first to comment

Dan Hill, Portable Cathedrals, 2011

Each mobile phone handset is not a mere product, perhaps like the other products that have traditionally adorned the pages of this magazine—as a chair is, or a lighting fixture is. Instead, each handset is a play in a wider global contest, a node in logistics networks of immense scale and complexity, a platform for an ecosystem of applications, an exemplar of the internet of things, a window onto the daily interactions of billions of users, of their ever-changing personalities and cultures, a product that consumers traditionally consider the most important in their possession, after the keys to their home.

The phone is an intimate device, not simply through its ubiquity and connectivity, its relationship with the body. While objects have long been cultural choices and symbolic goods, the mobile phone, being the most personal connection to the internet, is a device for generating symbolic goods, a vehicle for culture, a proxy for the owner’s identities. It is vast business and cultural phenomenon, all at once.