Process

Requirements-Driven Software Development Must Die

Posted in 2010s, Articles, Process, Project Management on July 25th, 2011 by Dan – Be the first to comment

Fred Beecher, Requirements-Driven Software Development Must Die, 2011

The process by which most enterprise software is developed is fatally flawed. There are flaws in any software development process, but in the past 13 years I’ve seen one approach produce more bad software and blow more budgets than any other: requirements-driven software development. Thankfully, I’ve also had the opportunity to see the success of an alternative type of process, a process in which user experience design drives what gets developed. This type of process helps teams deliver good software on time and within their budgets.

Requirements-driven software development fails mainly due to communication issues. Huge spreadsheets of detailed requirements, by themselves, are simply not an effective way to convey what an interactive system needs to do and how users need it to work. What does work, however, is validating those requirements with an interactive prototype.

Procedural Literacy: Educating the New Media Practitioner

Posted in 2000s, Articles, Process, Programming on June 29th, 2011 by Dan – Be the first to comment

Michael Mateas, “Procedural Literacy: Educating the New Media Practitioner” (2007)

Procedural literacy, of which programming is a part, is critically important for new media scholars and practitioners, that its opposite, procedurally illiteracy, leaves one fundamentally unable to grapple with the essence of computational media. In fact, one can argue that procedural literacy is a fundamental competence for everyone, required full participation in contemporary society, that believing only programmers (people who make a living at it) should be procedurally literate is like believing only published authors need to learn how to read and write; here I will restrict myself to the case of new media scholars and practitioners.

By procedural literacy I mean the ability to read and write processes, to engage procedural representation and aesthetics, to understand the interplay between the culturally-embedded practices of human meaning-making and technically-mediated processes. With appropriate programming, a computer can embody any conceivable process; code is the most versatile, general process language ever created. Hence, the craft skill of programming is a fundamental component of procedural literacy, though it is not the details of any particular programming language that matters, but rather the more general tropes and structures that cut across all languages.

Designing for Usability: Key Principles and What Designers Think

Posted in 1980s, Process, Usability on March 30th, 2011 by Dan – Be the first to comment

John D. Gould and Clayton Lewis, “Designing for Usability: Key Principles and What Designers Think” (pdf) (1985)

We recommend three principles of design.

Early Focus on Users and Tasks
First, designers must understand who the users will be. This understanding is arrived at in part by directly studying their cognitive, behavioral, anthropometric, and attitudinal characteristics, and in part by studying the nature of the work expected to be accomplished.

Empirical Measurement
Second, early in the development process, intended users should actually use simulations and prototypes to carry out real work, and their performance and reactions should be observed, recorded, and analyzed.

Iterative Design
Third, when problems are found in user testing, as they will be, they must be fixed. This means design must be iterative: There must be a cycle of design, test and measure, and redesign, repeated as often as necessary.

Inside Steve’s Brain

Posted in 2000s, History, Inspirational, Non-Fiction Books, Process, Project Management on October 7th, 2010 by Dan – Be the first to comment

Leander Kahney, Inside Steve’s Brain (2008)

This book might be the most complete look at what a design managers, VPs of design, or creative directors should be doing to improve their products.

Designing for the Digital Age

Posted in 2000s, Non-Fiction Books, Process on October 5th, 2010 by Dan – Be the first to comment

Kim Goodwin, Designing for the Digital Age: How to Create Human-Centered Products and Services (2009)

Designing for Interaction

Posted in 2000s, Basics, Ethics, Non-Fiction Books, Process on October 5th, 2010 by Dan – Be the first to comment

Dan Saffer, Designing for Interaction: Creating Innovative Applications and Devices (2nd Edition) (2009)

About Face 3

Posted in 2000s, Non-Fiction Books, Process on October 5th, 2010 by Dan – Be the first to comment

Alan Cooper, Robert Reimann, David Cronin, About Face 3: The Essentials of Interaction Design (2007)

Creating Persuasive Technologies: An Eight-Step Design Process

Posted in 2000s, Articles, Process on October 5th, 2010 by Dan – Be the first to comment

BJ Fogg, “Creating Persuasive Technologies: An Eight-Step Design Process” (pdf) (2009)

Performance by Design: The Role of Design in Software Product Development

Posted in 2000s, Articles, Process, Project Management on October 5th, 2010 by Dan – Be the first to comment

Bill Buxton, “Performance by Design: The Role of Design in Software Product Development” (pdf) (2003)

Strategies of Influence for Interaction Designers

Posted in 2000s, Articles, Process, Project Management on October 5th, 2010 by Dan – Be the first to comment

Scott Berkun, “Strategies of Influence for Interaction Designers” (2001)

Managing Complex Design Projects

Posted in 1990s, Articles, Process, Project Management on October 5th, 2010 by Dan – Be the first to comment

Hugh Dubberly, “Managing Complex Design Projects” (pdf) (1995)